Rear-Facing up to 18 kg

Recommended by leading consumer organizations

In most countries, car crashes are the leading cause of death of children aged one and above. Statistically, Group 1 children (from approx. 9 months to four years of age) see a significantly higher rate of injuries compared to the rearward facing group 0+. This statistic can be attributed to the child’s growth, as the head of the child as it is still relatively large and heavy and the neck muscles are not yet strong enough to withhold the forces of an accident.

Only at the age of approximately four years the head size in relation to the body evens out and the neck muscles have developed sufficiently to cope with heavier strains.

*source: WHO Europe, European Report on Child Injury Prevention, S.9; NHTSA, Traffic Safety Facts 2003, p.1

A forward facing child is subjected to extremely high forces in the case of an accident. In a front-impact crash, a typical 5-point harness system found in Group 1 car seats hold the shoulders back while the head of the child is propelled forward with a very high force.

In rear-facing car seats the forces of an impact are distributed evenly over a large area. The strain on the neck, head and chest is significantly reduced.

A rear-facing child car seat significantly reduces the risk of injury in a head-on collision when compared to a conventional forward-facing seat with harness system.

A rear-facing child seat reduces the risk of injury in a head-on collision significantly compared to a conventional forward-facing seat with harness system, as the force of an impact is distributed evenly over a large area.